Healthcare-Design

EPISODES

Episode 20: Tama Duffy Day - Health and Wellness Leader at Gensler

PART 1

Tama Duffy Day, Health & Wellness Leader at Gensler on the power of engaging the design professional to improve health and wellness, globally. Tama shares, “Whether I’m in Taiwan or China or Ireland or Pakistan or even domestically, talking with students in Fayetteville at the University of Arkansas or Moscow at the University of Idaho, or Chicago or The New York School of Interior Design, we all truly believe that the power of design does make a difference and it can enrich communities.” This and more on the changing face of healthcare design and its impact from one of the largest architecture firms in the world.

Tama Duffy Day is a global author, lecturer, and speaker. She and her team at Gensler have received more than 50 awards and honors for their work, and for three consecutive years Tama was named one of the “Most Influential People in Healthcare Design” by Healthcare Design magazine. Tama is one of the few design professionals inducted as a fellow into the American College of Healthcare Executives. Learn more about Tama Duffy Day and Gensler Architecture by visiting https://www.gensler.com/. Send your questions to Tama here: [email protected].

This podcast is brought to you by the award-winning Porcelanosa—a global innovator in tile, kitchen and bath products. Here’s something I bet you didn’t know about Porcelanosa: After 46 years, Porcelanosa is still a family-owned business, and with more than 970 stores in 150 countries, they are champions of a healthier planet. Learn more about Porcelanosa by visiting https://www.porcelanosa.com/.

Let’s play a game. I want you to count up every time you’ve had furniture delivered on a hospital or healthcare project, and the product fell short of your expectations. Do that on one hand. Now, on the other hand, I want you to count up how many times you’ve had to compromise the integrity of a project because you’ve been limited by furniture options and budget. Now, that was kind of a trick question because I know all of you need more than two hands to count up these situations. Here’s a solution: Stance Healthcare. Stance specializes in furniture for the hospital and healthcare setting, and they pride themselves on working with designers who need to modify furniture for a variety of end users. Here’s a great example. At the request of a designer, Stance modified their popular Legend chair to create a closed arm panel and they made the seat depth adjustable for different sized residents in an assisted living facility. How cool is that? Start exploring now at: http://stancehealthcare.com/.

Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:

  • The Center For Health Design
  • The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design

Learn more about how the Center for Health Design can support your firm by visiting: http://healthdesign.org.

Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/.

In part one of Cheryl’s conversation today with Tama Duffy Day, you will learn:

  • How healthcare design can and does have an impact on solving the health and wellness crisis in the US.
  • Since 2013, The Center on Society and Health at Virginia Commonwealth University has mapped life expectancy in the US in 21 different cities. Tama shares the results of this very powerful study.
  • Why it isn’t your DNA that determines life expectancy in the US, but rather your zip code.
  • Why it’s important to look at design through social and community issues and how design can increase the impact of change.
  • The story of how a much younger Tama helped a friend in a wheelchair create a friendlier home, and how this experience informed her perspective on design and the human experience.
  • Tama’s surprising answer to the question, “What makes a project successful?”
  • Learn about one of Gensler’s envisioning tools used with clients that’s different from anything you’ve ever heard before.
  • What does creating a legacy look like for Tama after 30 years of work.
  • How Tama envisioned and then created a platform for interior design voices to be heard at Contract Magazine.
  • Tama’s advice to interior design students of today.
  • Is Gensler hiring?

PART 2

In the second half of Cheryl’s conversation today with Tama Duffy Day, Health & Wellness Leader at Gensler Architecture, Tama offers insight into her two-year position as podcast host on Gensler’s popular podcast, Design Exchange. Tama’s gives her advice to other design firms about whether or not to start their own podcast. She shares, “Being a podcast host gives you an opportunity to allow someone else’s voice to be heard.” Tama shares her insight on this and more on the changing face of healthcare design and its potential to impact health and wellness, globally.

Tama Duffy Day is a global author, lecturer, and speaker. She and her team at Gensler have received more than 50 awards and honors for their work, and for three consecutive years Tama was named one of the “Most Influential People in Healthcare Design” by Healthcare Design magazine. Tama is one of the few design professionals inducted as a fellow into the American College of Healthcare Executives. Learn more about Tama Duffy Day and Gensler Architecture by visiting https://www.gensler.com/. Send your questions to Tama an email to: [email protected].

This podcast is brought to you by the award-winning Porcelanosa—a global innovator in tile, kitchen and bath products. Learn more about Porcelanosa by visiting https://www.porcelanosa.com/.

We’ve all seen some variation of this:

Somebody’s kid sibling gets into their parent’s closet and emerges, clothed in a dress or trousers that are 3 feet too long, trailing on the floor behind them.

It’s cute as all get-out, right?

It’s the end of 2019, and as healthcare thinking and design moves away from a one-size-fits-all, institutional mindset, towards a more personalized, individualized care model, designers are looking for ways to move away from one-size-fits-all thinking in your hospital, healthcare & senior living projects.

Here’s a great example from one of our podcast guests, Sara Parsons with Gallun Snow Associates.  Sara shares,“Different patient populations need different art and graphics. A still life of fruit will not comfort a surgery patient checking in on an empty stomach and a mountain stream may be uncomfortable for an ultrasound patient arriving as instructed with a full bladder.”

Art Addiction understands your unique challenges when it comes to selecting the very best artwork for your project. They offer a library of over 15,000 unique, gorgeous images, an in-house studio that can produce everything from small-scale yet durable and cleanable prints to mural-sized acrylic wall installations and their design support team is superb. Start exploring now by visiting https://www.artaddictioninc.com/.

Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:

  • The Center For Health Design
  • The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design

Learn more about how the Center for Health Design can support your firm by visiting: http://healthdesign.org.

Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/.

In part two of Cheryl’s conversation with Tama Duffy Day, you will learn:

  • How healthcare is different today than it was 10 years ago, and what this means for designers of today.
  • How new technology for healthcare is oftentimes like having a personal wellness coach.
  • How vulnerability plays a role in healthcare design and why it matters to your career.
  • What is generative space and how does it help healthcare professionals design better spaces?
  • The story of how Tama fell into healthcare design and why it stuck.
  • The concept of Gensler’s Boomtown and what the research has revealed about intergenerational living in thoughtful and meaningful ways.
  • The answer to the question, “What country is the first to have ‘gone gray’– the country where there are more older people than younger population groups?”
  • The changing face of senior living environments and new ways of providing care for older adults.
  • Tama’s answer to the question, “How is Gensler investing in innovation?”
  • Genler’s research on the design of a waiting room to explore the question, “Can you design a waiting room with intention and increase patient satisfaction?”
  • Find Gensler’s white papers at http://Gensler.com
  • Tama offers insight into her two year podcast host position on Gensler’s popular podcast Design Exchange and her advice to other firms on whether or not to start one.
  • What is special about Gensler’s ambulatory care project with Henry Ford Health System.
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Featured Product

Porcelanosa’s KRION® Solid Surface Material is made out of two-thirds natural minerals and a low percentage of high-resistance resins. KRION® is available in an array of colors, can be thermocurved or backlit, and is antibacterial – making it a perfect product for the healthcare industry. KRION® is also highly resistant to impacts and external elements (such as fire, chemicals, and frost), and is easy to clean and maintain.

Inspired by the properties of photocatalytic materials, Porcelanosa has evolved their KRION® Solid Surface material called K-LIFE. When K-LIFE comes into contact with light, it will be able to purify the air, expel harmful bacteria, and more. K-LIFE can easily be integrated into many applications – from wall coverings and claddings for ceilings, to custom tables, bars, sinks, shelving units and furniture. The application of K-LIFE in areas with high daily traffic, such as waiting rooms or reception areas, can assure a gradual decontamination of germs and lead to ongoing ecological benefits. Some research performed with KRION® K-LIFE, which has photocatalytic properties, proved that the material can significantly reduce the presence of bacteria. This revolutionary process has led to a patent pending, innovative, and exclusive product that will have a direct effect on our quality of life.

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