Healthcare-Design

EPISODES

Episode 37: Mary-Jean Eastman, FAIA, MRAIC, Co-Founder & Vice-Chair of Perkins Eastman

PART 1

Mary-Jean Eastman, FAIA, MRAIC, Co-Founder & Vice-Chair of Perkins Eastman is Cheryl’s guest today on the podcast. Today, women lead the majority of Perkins-Eastman offices and studios. However, it wasn’t always that way. When Mary-Jean Eastman entered architecture school in 1966, fewer than 10 percent of her classmates were women. What was that time like for Mary-Jean and how have women in architecture evolved to the more prominent leadership role they enjoy today at the firm and beyond? Mary-Jean shares, “We began to recognize the challenges for women and it became obvious that women were dropping out of the profession because of all these challenges. However, at the same time, women were entering architecture school in larger numbers and that made a huge difference. Our firm was becoming more prominent, and we were able to attract the most talented students and among them, many wonderful women. That is when our population started to change significantly.” Learn more about the history of Perkins-Eastman, how the firm responded to the pandemic in those first few months after COVID hit New York, and what changes are now being implemented in hospitals and healthcare facilities across the United States, on Part 1 of today’s episode.

Learn more about Mary-Jean Eastman and Perkins-Eastman by visiting: http://www.perkinseastman.com/.

In Part 1 of Cheryl’s conversation with Mary-Jean Eastman they discuss:

  • What it was like at Perkins-Eastman during the first few months of the crisis in New York which was hit hard with a surge of COVID-19 cases, early on.
  • What is like now for the firm to design hospitals, and how does COVID recovery play a role in this?
  • What has Perkins-Eastman learned so far from the pandemic and the equalization of care?
  • Today, women lead the majority of Perkins-Eastman offices and studios. However, when Mary-Jean Eastman entered architecture school in 1966, fewer than 10 percent of your classmates were women. What was that time like for Mary-Jean?
  • Hear about how a young Mary-Jean Eastman wanted to become an architect and how, despite her parents discouragement, because at the time women just didn’t do that, she moved into the field anyway.
  • How did Mary-Jean meet Brad Perkins and what led to their creation of Perkins-Eastman in 1981?
  • The 1980’s were a time when women were trying to assimilate into mainstream society and what this was like for Mary-Jean and other women architects at the time.
  • Mary-Jean has said that in her over 40-year career, her greatest opportunities with institutional buildings where the clients have often been women. Learn what these opportunities have been.
  • When Mary-Jean saw that women in architecture were dropping out of the profession, she also knew that more women were entering the architecture school than ever before.
  • When women comprised 45% of architecture school, it started to make a larger impact on the workforce. Perkins-Eastman at that time was becoming more established and was able to attract the best students coming out of school, who were often women.
  • Mary-Jean has been quoted as saying, “Providing women a seat at the table and ensuring diversity remains alive and well, and is something that I have been and remain passionate about.” Listen to Mary-Jean unpack this.

The world is changing quickly. The Center for Health Design is committed to providing the healthcare design and senior living design industries with the latest research, best practices and innovations. The Center can help you solve today’s biggest healthcare challenges and make a difference in care, safety, medical outcomes, and the bottom line.  Find out more at healthdesign.org.

Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:

  • The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers
  • The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design

Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.

Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/
Thank you for listening to today’s episode of Healthcare Interior Design 2.0. If you enjoyed any part of Cheryl’s conversation with Mary-Jean Eastman, please help our podcast grow by spreading the good word on social media and with your online community. Stay safe and be well. For the full roster of shows, visit http://healthcareidpodcast.com.


PART 2

In Part 2 of Cheryl’s interview with Mary-Jean Eastman, Co-Founder & Vice-Chair of Perkins Eastman, Cheryl asks Mary-Jean to describe her firm’s work with Memorial Sloan Kettering. “Memorial Sloan Kettering is one of the oldest and largest cancer centers in the world,” Mary-Jean begins. “When we started working with them, the mandate was to take an institution that was very much focused on research and make it a leader in patient centered care.” Learn more about the details of this project, it’s history with the firm, and what it means to design for cancer patients, on Part 2 of Cheryl’s interview today with Mary-Jean Eastman.

Learn more about Mary-Jean Eastman and Perkins-Eastman by visiting: http://www.perkinseastman.com/.

In Part 2 of Cheryl’s conversation with Mary-Jean Eastman, they discuss:

  • Why are complex healthcare projects important and interesting to Mary-Jean and what stories have come out of the past several decades from working on complex healthcare projects?
  • Why has Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center been such an important client to the firm and what is its history with the firm?
  • What is it like to design such a large facility for cancer patients and how is designing for this demographic different than designing for other types of patients?
  • Why did Perkins Eastman decide that it was going to be an employee-owned firm and what led to that decision?
  • A young 10-year old Mary-Jean knew that she wanted to be an architect but she kept this secret to herself and instead told the grownups that she wanted to be a teacher? What does this say about Mary-Jean’s generation of women and how has this changed?
  • When did Mary-Jean discover that she loved to solve complex problems?
  • What is the future of healthcare design and how will technology play a role in this?
  • What advice does Mary-Jean have for young women in architectural school who are interested in specializing in healthcare, but are afraid of it?

Thank you for listening to today’s episode of Healthcare Interior Design 2.0. If you enjoyed any part of Cheryl’s conversation with Mary-Jean Eastman, please help our podcast grow by spreading the good word on social media and with your online community. Stay safe and be well. For the full roster of shows, visit http://healthcareidpodcast.com.

The world is changing quickly. The Center for Health Design is committed to providing the healthcare design and senior living design industries with the latest research, best practices and innovations. The Center can help you solve today’s biggest healthcare challenges and make a difference in care, safety, medical outcomes, and the bottom line.  Find out more at healthdesign.org.
Additional support for this podcast comes from our industry partners:

  • The American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers
  • The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design

Learn more about how to become a Certified Healthcare Interior Designer®  by visiting the American Academy of Healthcare Interior Designers at: https://aahid.org/.
Connect to a community interested in supporting clinician involvement in design and construction of the built environment by visiting The Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design at https://www.nursingihd.com/

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Inspired by the properties of photocatalytic materials, Porcelanosa has evolved their KRION® Solid Surface material called K-LIFE. When K-LIFE comes into contact with light, it will be able to purify the air, expel harmful bacteria, and more. K-LIFE can easily be integrated into many applications – from wall coverings and claddings for ceilings, to custom tables, bars, sinks, shelving units and furniture. The application of K-LIFE in areas with high daily traffic, such as waiting rooms or reception areas, can assure a gradual decontamination of germs and lead to ongoing ecological benefits. Some research performed with KRION® K-LIFE, which has photocatalytic properties, proved that the material can significantly reduce the presence of bacteria. This revolutionary process has led to a patent pending, innovative, and exclusive product that will have a direct effect on our quality of life.

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